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September Movie Night at the ASTT

September 25, 2015 @ 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Free

Come to the ASTT on September 25th 2015 to enjoy another film in our movie night series. A film on Gerhard Richter will be shown from 7:30pm . Admission is free.

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Gerhard Richter (German: [ˈʀɪçtɐ]; born 9 February 1932) is a German visual artist and one of the pioneers of the New European Painting that emerged in the second half of the twentieth century. Richter has produced abstract as well as photorealistic paintings, and also photographs and glass pieces. His art follows the examples of Picassoand Jean Arp in undermining the concept of the artist’s obligation to maintain a single cohesive style.

Richter created various painting pictures from black-and-white photographs during the 1960s and early 1970s, basing them on a variety of sources: newspapers and books, sometimes incorporating their captions, (as in Helga Matura (1966)); private snapshots; aerial views of towns and mountains, (Cityscape Madrid (1968) and Alps (1968)); seascapes (1969–70); and a large multi-partite work made for the German Pavilion in the 1972 Venice Biennale. For Forty-eight Portraits (1971–2), he chose mainly the faces of composers such as Gustav Mahler and Jean Sibelius, and of writers such as H. G. Wells and Franz Kafka.

From his “Writings”, the following refer to quotations regarding photography, its relationship with painting, and the “blur”:

  • “The photograph is the most perfect picture. It does not change; it is absolute, and therefore autonomous, unconditional, devoid of style. Both in its ways of informing, and in what it informs of, it is my source.”
  • “I don’t create blurs. Blurring is not the most important thing; nor is it an identity tag for my pictures. When I dissolve demarcations and create transition, this is not in order to destroy the representation, or to make it more artistic or less precise. The flowing transitions, the smooth equalizing surface, clarify the content and make the representation credible (an “alla prima” impasto would be too reminiscent of painting, and would destroy the illusion).”
  • “I blur things to make everything equally important and equally unimportant. I blur things so that they do not look artistic or craftsmanlike but technological, smooth and perfect. I blur things to make all the parts a closer fit. Perhaps I also blur out the excess of unimportant information.”

Many of these paintings are made in a multi-step process of representations. He starts with a photograph, which he has found or taken himself, and projects it onto his canvas, where he traces it for exact form. Taking his color palette from the photograph, he paints to replicate the look of the original picture. His hallmark “blur” is achieved sometimes with a light touch of a soft brush, sometimes a hard smear by an aggressive pull with a squeegee.

 

Excerpt from Wikipedia

 

Details

Date:
September 25, 2015
Time:
7:30 PM - 9:00 PM
Cost:
Free
Event Category:

Organizer

Art Society Of Trinidad And Tobago
Phone:
(868) 622 9827
Website:
www.artsocietytt.org

Venue

Art Society Trinidad & Tobago Gallery
Corner Jamaica Blvd. and St. Vincent Avenue, Federation Park
Port Of Spain, Trinidad And Tobago
+ Google Map
Phone:
(868) 622 9827
Website:
www.artsocietytt.org